The Ideology of Higher Education in the African Dilemma | by Francis Egbokhare

We can be knowledgeable with other people’s knowledge; we can’t be wise with their wisdom (Michel de Montaigne 1533—1592)  The global agenda for Higher Education is defined in terms of the predominating human development issues and the strategies for resolving them. The challenges include poverty, gender equity, diversity, violence and conflicts,  the environment, access, literacy,…

Capitalism and Human Nature Must Be Regulated | by Donal Mahoney

“What can we do to make this right?” The speaker is Phil Burns, owner of the brokerage firm that Owen Mitchell has had money invested with for years. Owen’s not rich and not poor. He just prefers the action of the stock market to the passivity of fixed income. Owen says nothing, sits in his…

PIN QUARTERLY JOURNAL (ISSUE 7): CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Building on the remarkable success of previous issues of the PIN Quarterly Journal, Poets in Nigeria (PIN) calls for entries aligning with various columns of the journal due for release in the fourth week of April, 2017. The columns listed below are opened to corresponding entries: CRISPY SATIRE: features poems with satirical attributes. POETIC INSIGHT:…

AMERICAN NOTES 2 | by Fred Russell

NEWSSPEAK Journalists talk and write in platitudes. This is not surprising. They are not, after all, writers. Their command of the language is limited. Their minds are commonplace. They are also not scholars or political scientists. I occasionally watch Fox News, but what is true of Fox is true of any other news organization. The…

AMERICAN NOTES | by Fred Russell

EDUCATION IN AMERICA  Bill O’Reilly has discovered that Americans are ignorant “about their own country.” He told us so not too long ago, quoting Newsweek for the numbers, though he could just as easily have quoted some of Jay Leno’s man-in-the-street interviews (it turns out that 29% of Americans don’t know who the vice president…

Eight Men Who Are Doing Quite Well | by Donal Mahoney

A notice appeared in the paper recently with the names and faces of eight men who have a combined wealth of $426 billion. According to Oxfam International, in 2015 this would have equaled the amount of wealth held by half the world’s population, the poorest half. Oxfam International is a confederation of charitable organizations in 90 countries…

The Trio That Should Have Reshaped Jazz | by Scott Archer Jones

On the seafloor of the Stockholm archipelago near Ingarö the tides swept a body not yet dead back and forth, in eddies of dust that tornadoed up into black, cold water. Jazz had missed its chance again. Each decade gifted people kick jazz down the road like a can, people like Joshua Redman, Nicholas Payton,…

​Passing It On | by Pam Munter 

The night club is dark and seedy, but I can easily identify the bones of what was once reputedly a hot spot for the Rat Pack in the 1960s here in Palm Springs.  An alleged quote from Frank Sinatra covers much of one wall, meant to evoke a different era: “Alcohol may be man’s worst…

YOU’RE YET TO BE CERTIFIED AS ‘MAD’ | by Akinlosose Ayomikun

Sometimes some people say our dressing is just an expression and that it doesn’t define who we really are. Some even quote that popular saying ‘don’t judge a book by its cover’, but when I watched ‘ Desperate Housewives’, I got an answer for that. Susan Mayer told her daughter, you will judge that book…

KEN SARO-WIWA PRIZE FOR BOOK REVIEW 2016 – call for entries

In continuation of a legacy project that the Committee for Relevant Art, CORA, promoters of the annual Lagos Book & Art Festival , LABAF, launched last year, we hereby call for submission of entries in respect of the annual KEN SARO-WIWA PRIZE FOR BOOK REVIEW 2016. The project is designed to further a key objective…

“Lingua Franca: From Nigerian Pidgin to Naija Languej” by Eriata Oribhabor

Nigerian pidgin is the most popular form of communication in use in Nigeria by Nigerians irrespective of tribal or religious affiliation. By reason of long stay in the country or sheer determination to learn it for ease of communication with Nigerians for business and pleasure, non-Nigerians either speak. Its origins lie in the Niger Delta…

Abuja | by Prof. Francis O. Egbokhare

I was in Abuja during the week. I drove into the generic city after 9pm. I never cease to be fascinated by the city for many reasons. The city was grown, not developed. It was constructed not built. I call Abuja a generic city because it lacks culture. Except if you regard as culture the…

WHAT IS IN A NAME? BY PROFESSOR FRANCIS EGBOKHARE

I gave a seven year old the following names: Braimoh, Stephen, Uzor, Segun. I asked him to say which of the persons is most intelligent. He picked Stephen. I then asked him to pick the most successful of  the underlisted names: Marion, Bilikisu, Okon, Chukwu, Osaghaede. Marion turned out to be the most successful. Joke…

WORDS ARE LIKE CLAY by Professor Francis Egbokhare

If you are a linguist like I am, chances are that you have come to appreciate the value of words. Politicians with savvy know too well that politics is about weaving words like a spider and getting all others but oneself caught in the web. Words evoke emotions; they help us to think clearly. The…